Episode 3: Frolic in the Rain

Episode 3: Frolic in the Rain

Frolic in the Rain

Rain is a blessing after a drought, a symbol of God’s love and teachings to spread over the world. It’s always very special when the wet season comes and the rain pours down upon this parched land of ours, setting the dry rivers running and bringing a new freshness to the environment. The ancient roman philosopher, Seneca, said: Life is the fire that burns and the sun that gives light. Life is the wind and the rain and the thunder in the sky. Life is matter and is earth, what is and what is not, and what beyond is in Eternity. Make time and take the opportunities to make memories every day. Remember, every moment in life is an act of faith.


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It’s always very special when the wet season comes and the rain pours down upon this parched land of ours, setting the dry rivers running and bringing a new freshness to the environment. The overflowing rivers become a very real attraction in areas like ours, where rain is so scarce. And, what a joy it is to lie in bed at night, listening to the steady beat of raindrops on a tin roof. What about those special childhood memories that also come flooding in — we’d frolic in the summer rain, splashing in backyard puddles, tempting the distant rumble of thunder. Those times of carefree nothingness. It’s very special, alright!

A little girl of about 6 years old was shopping with her mother, when it began to pour heavily with rain. It was the kind of rain that even the gutters couldn’t handle, so much in a hurry to hit the earth it has no time to flow down the downpipes. Shoppers just stood around, as to go outside meant getting soaked to the skin. So, they waited, some patiently, others irritated because nature messed up their hurried day.

Some though were delighted and mesmerised by rainfall and got lost in the sound and sight of the heavens washing away the dirt and dust of the world. Memories of running, splashing so carefree as a child came pouring in as a welcome reprieve from the worries of their day.
Her little voice was so sweet as it broke the hypnotic trance they were all caught in, ‘Mum let’s run through the rain,’ she said. ‘What?’ Mum asked. ‘Let’s run through the rain!’ she repeated. ‘No, honey. We’ll wait until it slows down a bit,’ Mum replied.
This young child waited a minute and repeated: ‘Mum, let’s run through the rain…’
‘We’ll get soaked if we do,’ Mum said. ‘No, we won’t, Mum. That’s not what you said this morning,’ the young girl said as she tugged at her Mum’s arm.
‘This morning? When did I say we could run through the rain and not get wet?’

‘Don’t you remember? When you were talking to Daddy about his cancer, you said, ‘ If God can get us through this, He can get us through anything! ‘
The entire crowd stopped dead silent. You couldn’t hear anything but the rain. The shoppers all stood silently. No one left. Mum paused and thought for a moment about what she would say.
Now some would laugh it off and scold her for being silly. Some might even ignore what was said. But this was a moment of affirmation in a young child’s life. A time when innocent trust can be nurtured so that it will bloom into faith.
‘Honey, you are absolutely right. Let’s run through the rain. If GOD lets us get wet, well maybe we just need washing,’ Mum said.
Then off they ran. The people all stood watching, smiling and laughing as they darted past the cars and yes, through the puddles. They got soaked. They were followed by a few who screamed and laughed like children all the way to their cars. And yes, they all got wet. They needed washing.

A child can teach an adult three things: to be happy for no reason, to always be busy with something and to know how to demand what he or she wants, as forcefully as possible.

Sunshine is delicious, rain is refreshing, wind braces us up, snow is exhilarating; there is really no such thing as bad weather, only different kinds of good weather. The poet Henry Wadsworth Longfellow wrote: Thy fate is the common fate of all; Into each life some rain must fall.

In life, circumstances or people can take away your material possessions, your money, and your health. But no one can ever take away your precious memories… So, don’t forget to make time and take the opportunities to make memories every day. Remember, every moment in life is an act of faith.

The ancient roman philosopher, Seneca, said: Life is the fire that burns and the sun that gives light. Life is the wind and the rain and the thunder in the sky. Life is matter and is earth, what is and what is not, and what beyond is in Eternity.

Rain is referred to as a blessing after a drought, a symbol of God’s love and teachings to spread over the world. In the Bible, the Acts of the Apostles tells us of God’s goodness to us: “… he did not leave you without evidence of himself in the good things he does for you: he sends you rain from heaven and seasons of fruitfulness; he fills you with food and your hearts with merriment…” [Acts 14:17].

I hope that, just like the little girl and her mother, you still take the time to run through the rain.

 

Look for the silver lining.

This is Terry Lees

[Music: Raindrops Keep Falling on My Head – B J Thomas]